A Senior Tradition!

It is a tradition here at Marist School for the Senior Class to dress-up in their Halloween costumes (faculty is invited to join in on the fun as well!).

Starting with some cartoon characters…

The Incredibles!

The Incredibles!

 

Minions

Minions

Trophies – sprayed in all gold…

Can you believe the "Trophies"?!!

Can you believe the “Trophies”?!!

who knew there was a Roller Barbie…

Christmas Barbie, Roller Barbie, Birthday Barbie and Cowboy Barbie

Christmas Barbie, Roller Barbie, Birthday Barbie and Cowboy Barbie

a classic Chicago tribute…

Blues Brothers

Blues Brothers

Foundations teachers…

A Compound Sentence from our 7th grade teachers.

A Compound Sentence from our 7th grade teachers.

and what is a morning without bacon and eggs.

Bacon and Eggs!

Bacon and Eggs!

Happy Halloween from all of us here at Marist School!

My Own Holiday Tradition

My Own Holiday Tradition: by Mary Helen

Every year Marist School hosts hundreds of vendors on campus for a huge arts and crafts show called Holiday Traditions, and each year it gets bigger and better. Every year, my friend Anna and I go and walk around together. We make sure to set aside a few hours each year to get some shopping done and enjoy each other’s company. It is the kickoff to our holiday season.

Usually around Wednesday the week before Holiday Traditions, you begin to see signs of preparation on campus. Spaces are chalked out in the arcade for vendors, extension cords are spread out, and Christmas decorations are put up. You can feel the positive spirit in the air. That energy continues throughout the preparation to the day of the fair. Everyone is getting in the holiday spirit, so it is a happy time to be around campus.

Through our many trips to Holiday Traditions, Anna and I have learned that going later is best. Not only is there less of a crowd, but prices are also slashed towards the end of the day (a little shopping tip for next year, haha). I love walking around and shopping for gifts. There are so many cool booths with everything from bird houses, to hand knit mittens, to beautiful paintings. Without a doubt, my favorite place to stop by each year is the student vendor area. Each year I am amazed by the talents of Marist students. Coming from me, one of the least artistically gifted people in my family, it might not mean much, but the students always impress me. For example, one of my friends makes candles with his mom and sells them every year. And this year another boy in my grade was selling prints of gorgeous water colors he had painted. Plus, there are a lot of girls selling cute, hand-made jewelry. It is a great way to find out about talents you might not know people had and also for students to share talents with not only each other but also the community outside of Marist.

Anna and I come back each year not only for the great holiday shopping, but also to see people we know. Holiday Traditions serves as a gathering place for the Marist community and the greater community around Marist School. You are likely to see tons of Alumni, current students, teachers, and even friends from other schools as you walk up and down the rows. It is a fun time to relax and catch up with people you might not see very often. Plus, it is amazing to see the community come together and create such a great event each year.

Oh, how I’ve been blessed!

Morning Prayer: Oh, how I’ve been blessed!
Mission Trip Week – October 22, 2013
Prayer by Katie ’15:

For the past two years, I’ve gone on a mission trip called Catholic HEART Workcamp. It has been such an amazing experience each time I’ve gone, and I want to share a little bit of that today.

Catholic HEART is a little bit different than a typical mission trip. Instead of working with everyone in the group that you go with, you work with random people from parishes around the country. They put you in these groups and then for four days, you work on a project or various projects in the area around the community. This year, my group and another group spent our time bonding with and helping our residents, Ken and Debbie. Ken and Debbie lived in a small, cluttered house in a mountainous area in Betsey Layne, Kentucky. Their home was in desperate need of general repairs, but they couldn’t afford any of it. I will never forget how many times Debbie thanked us or the tears she had in her eyes when we had finished painting the whole outside of the house, staining the deck, and cleaning the yard. Ken had health problems, so she thanked us on behalf of the both of them, constantly saying how thankful she was to have us there.

One day, it started pouring while we were working, so all 16 of us huddled inside their small living room. Ken and Debbie opened their home and their hearts to us, sharing all sorts of stories about how they met, how he proposed, and eventually talking about some of the struggles they had faced. Despite everything they had gone through, they both had extremely strong faiths. While all of us were huddled in the living room, Debbie left and came back with some sheet music. All of us fell quiet as she sang to us, verse by verse praising a God that she knew to be with her no matter what. Unfortunately, I don’t remember everything that she said, but one line really stood out. Over and over Debbie sang “Oh how I’ve been blessed; God is so good to me; oh how I’ve been blessed”.

Let us pray:

Dear Lord,

Thank you for the opportunities you place in our lives to grow and be inspired by the other people that we encounter. Thank you for blessing us with everything and every opportunity we have and for being with us throughout the hard times as well as the good ones. “Oh how I’ve been blessed. God is so good to me, oh how I’ve been blessed”.

Amen

Mary, seat of wisdom, pray for us.

Marist’s Brick Walls Bleed Blue and Gold

Homecoming Week.  While it’s a tradition in any school (especially in the South), everyone celebrates this high school “spirited holiday” differently – and this year, Marist put out the tallest Christmas tree, the heaviest turkey, and the most Easter eggs.  (Or in other words, we went all out.)  I can’t speak for how other high schools exhibit their school spirit, but more so than ever, the War Eagles are showing ourselves and our entire neighborhood just how united we can be, not only a student body, but also as a Marist community – from kids to parents to teachers to alumni – in our spirit days, in our football games, and in our everyday interactions.

As Student Council Co-President, few things make me happier than seeing all our students working together to really make our school climate the most positive, the most welcoming, the most spirited it can be – and after the six years that I’ve been at Marist, I can certainly say that this time around, we’re more united than ever – and I’m not just saying that because I’m the president.  I’m saying it because of the 7th graders who wouldn’t stop screaming their War Eagle pride at our first pep rally.  I’m saying it because of the seniors who had no shame in dressing all out according to our Vintage Blue & Gold out-of-uniform day.  I’m saying it because of the teachers who are consciously making an effort to be involved in all aspects of school life – from the 8:30 am bell to the 7:30 pm football game blare.  I’m saying it because of the students who are proud of Marist, of their accomplishments, of the people around them.  I’m saying it because of every week – not just Spirit Week – when War Eagle Fever is in the air.

Friday Night War Eagle Fever!

Friday Night War Eagle Fever!

Sure, Spirit Week was exceptional from Monday’s Find the Keychain Day all the way to Saturday’s “Party at Gatsby’s” Homecoming dance.  Tuesday’s GATSBY out-of-uniform day, for example, brought Gypsies, Artists, Toddlers, Superheros, Bumblebees, and Yellow mustard to our campus, based on a letter in the theme word (see how it spelled GATSBY? check out the picture post), and the rest of the week – from Homecoming T-Shirt Day to Flashback Friday – also really allowed for the blue and gold to bleed from the walls of our over-50 year old school building.

Homecoming Gatsby Style

Homecoming Gatsby Style

But now, we as a Student Council have to look beyond Spirit Week to maintain that same energy going forward, and we certainly are trying to do just that.  You see, October and November at any school tend to feel like some of the longer months, with Homecoming over and students simply waiting for Christmas break – but no more at Marist.  Our Student Council officers are determined to keep that spirit flowing in between classes and beyond, so I guess you’ll have to stay tuned to see how our students respond to our as-of-yet undisclosed upcoming initiatives.  I’d tell you now, but we don’t want to jinx anything, now, do we?  We certainly don’t want that Fever to go away.

We Are Family

Once, in AP Language and Composition (affectionately called AP Lang), the class was having a discussion about the reading from the night before. Ms. Limlamai asked the class a question that no one had yet considered. After a moment or two of contemplative silence, I answered the question with another question, receiving some groans and some friendly smack talk. One of my classmates leaned over to me and laughed, “Serena, I feel like you LIKE school.”

The friendly accusation resonated with me. At the risk of being seen as “a dork” my answer is yes, I do like school.

Before you get any ideas, don’t get me wrong, schoolwork can be tedious and boring, and there are definitely some classes that I enjoy more than others. I most certainly don’t look forward to tests, I still groan at pop quizzes,  high school drama is inevitable and unavoidable, and stressful late nights are not exactly my forte, but I genuinely enjoy school. For a while, I couldn’t put my finger on the reason, but I think I’ve figured it out.

I love that Marist is a community first and foremost. There are hundreds of ways I could explain this aspect of my school, but my favorite example of this is Monday night Emmaus Meetings. First, some background.

All retreats at Marist are optional and are lead by classmates and peers, which is probably what makes them so successful. Emmaus is a junior and senior retreat lead by seniors that is backed by nearly 40 years of tradition. I attended the retreat as a junior and was chosen by teachers and peers to be 1 of the 5 Emmaus leaders on Emmaus Board—in other words, one of the five spiritual leaders of the school which is an incredible honor that I’m still not sure I’ve totally processed. Being on Board makes the entire Emmaus tradition near and dear to my heart. The monthly meetings are an integral part of the tradition.

The Emmaus Board on the first day of school

The Emmaus Board on the first day of school

The first Monday of each month is an Emmaus Meeting night. From 7 pm until whenever it’s over, a group of juniors and seniors gather in the sacristy of the chapel to…well, meet. All juniors and seniors are welcome whether or not they’ve attended the retreat yet, so every month the crowd is different. Each meeting has a topic such as Light of My Life or Where I See God or Burdens. A pair of Emmaus Retreat Leaders lead the discussion with a personal story or two, and then they open the floor. Whoever wants to speak, may. There are those who have something to share at every meeting and some who generally just listen—the meetings need both to make the magic that happens. We laugh, we inevitably cry, and we learn more about each other than we ever would have otherwise. Sometimes the meetings last 30 minutes, and sometimes they last two hours. The meetings only come to a close when it seems that everyone who would like to share has shared.

At the end of the meetings, we pray for one another, and then we share the sign of peace. Everyone hugs everyone else. Literally. No matter how close you are to a certain somebody, you hug each other, and oftentimes the hug is accompanied by a “Thank you for sharing” or a “I loved getting to know you better” or, my personal favorite, “I’m so glad I came.”

Some type of magic happens in that sacristy that can’t completely be contributed to the fact that…well, we meet in a sacristy. The bonds that form at the meetings are so deep and so personal that I leave every month feeling recharged. The community that we create together at Marist has and will continue to make such an wonderful impact on me and the way I see my peers and my school.

Spirit Day – Gatsby Style

This week is spirit week at Marist School with different spirit activities leading up to Homecoming this weekend.  Our theme this year is An Evening with Gatsby.  Today’s spirit activity is to dress up according to your grade’s assigned letter.  12th grade=G; 11th grade=A; 10th grade=T; 9th grade=S; 8th grade=B; 7th grade=Y.  Check it out!

Grandma and Geeky Grandson

Grandma and Geeky Grandson

Atlanta Thrasher

Atlanta Thrasher

Taco!

Taco!

Superheros

Superheros

8th grade girls homeroom

8th grade girls homeroom

7th grade boys homeroom

7th grade boys homeroom

Marist School Spirit

Everyone at Marist is very involved, and this time of year, I find there is always something to do. Right now I am spending most of my time playing Varsity Softball and creating the Yearbook. My days are packed tight, but they are full of things I love. With all of my activities plus the college application process, I am in a constant state of business.

On top of all these things I have to do personally, there is so much going on in general at Marist. Football games are a popular way to end the week for students. Last week was Camo night for the Seniors as we played one of our rivals, Lovett School. It is always fun to play schools where we know other students. It heightens everyone’s drive to win, so students get more involved and cheer louder. This past Friday night, school spirit was at an all-time high. The game went into double overtime, and I have never seen the Seniors so involved in a game. Even though we lost the game, we couldn’t have cheered any harder.

The beginning of this year has set the bar high in terms of school spirit. I am on the Senior Spirit Committee and am thrilled to be participating in this way. The first school pep rally of the year was a few weeks ago. It was one of the best we have had in my time at Marist, and I’m not just saying that because I led it, haha. The success of the pep rally had little to do with who was leading it, and more to do with students involvement and cheering. You could feel the excitement in the air. Whenever all the students get excited, the whole energy of the school changes. We become a united front that can take on anything.

I hope this united student body that we have been this first couple weeks can become the norm for the year. Everything is so much more fun when the entire student body cares and is involved. I hope that this year as a Senior Class we can get the school to be more involved than ever to make it a memorable year for everyone.
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